Adverbs are words that modify
  • a verb (He drove slowly. — How did he drive?)
  • an adjective (He drove a very fast car. — How fast was his car?)
  • another adverb (She moved quite slowly down the aisle. — How slowly did she move?)
As we will see, adverbs often tell when, where, why, or under what conditions something happens or happened. Adverbs frequently end in -ly; however, many words and phrases not ending in -ly serve an adverbial function and an -ly ending is not a guarantee that a word is an adverb. The words lovely, lonely, motherly, friendly, neighborly, for instance, are adjectives:

  • That lovely woman lives in a friendly neighborhood.
Kinds of Adverbs
Adverbs of Manner
   She moved slowly and spoke quietly.


Adverbs of Place
   She has lived on the island all her life. 
   She still lives there now.



Adverbs of Frequency
   She takes the boat to the mainland every day.
   She often goes by herself.



Adverbs of Time
   She tries to get back before dark.
   It's starting to get dark now.
   She finished her tea first.
   She left early.



Adverbs of Purpose
   She drives her boat slowly to avoid hitting the rocks.
   She shops in several stores to get the best buys.


Adverbs of Degree
Adverbs of degree tell us the strength or intensity of something that happens. Many adverbs are gradable, that is, we can intensify them. Basically they answer the sort of question that asks How much ...? or How little...?
Adverbs of degree include; adequately, almost, entirely, extremely, greatly, highly, hugely, immensely, moderately, partially, perfectly, practically, profoundly, strongly, totally, tremendously, very, virtually etc.
For example:-
The man drove badly. = The man drove really badly. - In this sentence really shows us just how badly he drove.

They enjoyed the film. = They enjoyed the film immensely. - In this sentence immensely shows us how much they enjoyed the film.
These intensifiers are not gradable though, you cannot say The man drove extremely very badly.

Adverbs of Duration
Adverbs of duration tell us how long something happened.
They include; briefly, forever, long, shortly, permanantly, temporarily . . .
For example:
"They were occupied." = "They were briefly occupied." - In this sentence briefly shows us the duration.
"The phone was out of order." = "The phone was temporarily out of order." - In this sentence temporarily shows us the duration.

Adverbs of Frequency
Adverbs of duration tell us how long something happened.
They include; briefly, forever, long, shortly, permanantly, temporarily . . .
For example:
"They were occupied." = "They were briefly occupied." - In this sentence briefly shows us the duration.
"The phone was out of order." = "The phone was temporarily out of order." - In this sentence temporarily shows us the duration.

Adverbs of Manner
Some adverbs tell us how an action is or should be performed.
Often these adverbs are formed by adding -ly to the end of an adjective.
Adjectives ending -l add -ly ; careful-carefully.
Adjectives ending -y change to -ily ; lucky-luckily

Adverbs of Place
Adverbs of place indicate where something happens.
These include; abroad, anywhere, here, outside, somewhere, there, underground, upstairs ...
For example:
My passport is here in my bag. 

Adverbs of Probability
Adverbs of probability tell us the likelihood of something happening.
If you imagine playing dice, what's the likelihood (probability) of rolling a six? It's possible, but it's not certain. You'll certainly throw something between one and six, but your not likely to throw two sixes.
Adverbs of probability include; certainly, definitely, doubtless, maybe, perhaps, possibly, probably etc.
For example:
We will win the game. = We will certainly win the game. - In this sentence certainly shows us the probability.

Adverbs of time
Some adverbs tell us when something happened.
These include:afterwards, later, now, soon, yesterday.
For example:-
Yesterday all my troubles seemed so far away. - In this sentence yesterday shows us when.

Adverbs of Comparison
When we compare what two things or people do we look at what makes one different from the other.
Adverbs of comparison are used to show what one thing does better or worse than the other.
When an adverb ends in -ly, more is put in front of the adverb.
For example:-

  • "Jill did her homework more frequently."


With our free PDF notes you can get success in any competitive or entrance exams like CTET,  KVS, NET, CAT, MAT, CMAT, SSC, B.ED, IBPS Recruitment, IAS, CSAT, State Civil Services Exams, UPTET, PSTET, HTET & many more. It also provides NCERT solutions, CBSE, NTSE, Olympiad study material, Indian General Knowledge, English, Hindi, Mathematics, Current affairs, Science, S.ST, model test papers, important Questions and Answers asked in CBSE examinations.

Post a Comment Blogger

 
Top