Case is the grammatical function of a noun or pronoun. There are only three cases in modern English, they are subjective (he), objective (him) and possessive (his).

The pronoun cases are simple though. There are only three:-
1. Subjective case: pronouns used as subject.

2. Objective case: pronouns used as objects of verbs or prepositions. 
3. Possessive case: pronouns which express ownership.


Personal Pronoun
Subjective/Nominative
Objective/Accusative
Possessive/Genitive
Referring to the subject in a sentence
Referring to the object in a sentence
The apostrophe form of the word ("Lynne's).
I
Me
Mine
You
You
Yours
He
Him
His
She
Her
Hers
It
It
Its
We
Us
Ours
They
Them
Theirs
Who
Whom
Whose

pronouns, and who and its compounds, are the only words that are inflected in all three cases (subjective, objective, possessive). In nouns the first two cases (subjective and objective) are indistinguishable, and are called the common case. 

Subjective / Nominative Case

Used especially to identify the subject of a finite verb.
A noun or pronoun is in the subjective when it is used as the subject of the sentence or as a predicate noun. In the following examples, nouns and pronouns in the subjective case are italicized.
A noun in the subjective case is often the subject of a verb.
For example:
  • "The tree fell on my car", "the tree" is in the nominative case because it's the subject of the verb "fell".

Objective / Accusative Case

A noun or pronoun is in the objective case when it is used as a direct object, an indirect object, or an object.  
A noun which is directly affected by the action of a verb is put into the objective case. In English we call this noun the "direct object" which is a little more descriptive of its function. It's the direct object of some action.
  • Robert fixed the car.
In the example above, the "car" is in the objective case because it's the direct object of Robert's action of fixing.

Possessive Case

The possessive case is used to show ownership. (Lynne's website.)
The good news is that the genetive case is used less and less in English today. Hooray!
You may still hear someone say something like "The mother of the bride," but it could equally be; "The bride's mother."
However, the possessive pattern ('s) is generally used when indicate a relation of ownership or association with a person, rather than a thing.
For example:-
  • Lynne's web site kept growing larger and larger.
There are, as ever, exceptions to this rule. When a group of people is involved or animals.
For example:-
  • The members' forum.
  • The dogs' tails. 

Genitive Case

You should still use the genetive case when talking about things that belong to other things.
For example:-
  • The door of the car.
  • The content of the website.
  • The top of the page.


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